Orientation And Mobility عمومی
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Host Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken, President and CEO Safe Toddles non-profit discusses safe mobility for learners who were born blind and visually impaired. In 2021/22, I worked with co-host Kelvin Crosby. Together we interviewed belt cane users and people who grew up blind without belt canes. I also read several of my blogs that discuss the research outcomes of using belt canes aloud. In 2023, I am sharing the over 100 interviews I conducted with adults born blind or mobility visually impaired. ...
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This is the soundtrack of the video posted on YouTube. It shows footage from 1960s and audio tape interviews of children born blind in the 1950s. Marcia new she was blind when she entered kindergarten. She noticed her peers ran around and she didn’t. Running without a two-step safety buffer is not recommended. A 1966 blind high schooler is shown be…
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Maureen Moscato – a really good friend of mine – she is so funny. I found the original tape – It is worth a relisten!! She is much funnier than I am playing her!! Yay!! Maureen is a real treasure – her stories reveal a woman who grew up in the school of hard knocks and her resiliency go her through – but if you’re interested in the pros and cons of…
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Marcia, born in 1950, is an example of what everyone would like me to understand – she is such a successful person (may she rest). Born blind she was an independent child – from her accounts she hated the long cane as a child, and she didn’t need it. This is the story that every parent wants to hear – that their child will grow up like Marcia – a s…
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Today I’m sharing the interview with Jerry, conducted March 11, 2001. He is visually impaired, but not mobility visually impaired, except at night. His experiences at night in winter snow demonstrate the resilience of mankind in the face of daunting odds, but also how alone people with visual impairments feel – never once had he considered bringing…
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Betty grew up without a mobility tool – she will not admit to having any difficulties in her life, and on the surface one can attest – she is the embodiment of success. She is educated, she has a job, she is well-spoken and capable. As an O&M instructor – my interest is in the travel decision. She talked about using a guide to move about and she wa…
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Today’s interview is with Kathleen, born in 1949 with retinopathy of prematurity. Her story life with this vision is one of living in the margins as far as getting services. She had no specialized services as a child, conceivably she was considered to have too much vision – she was not “legally blind”. She got her first cane at age 48 – for protect…
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Gloria grew up with low vision, she couldn’t read street signs or see important details but moved about her world with her peers. She remembered having no difficulty getting around her hometown or otherwise, until she lost more of her vision when she was 40 years old. That caused her to lose her job and relearn how to get about places she knew well…
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Today’s show is with Doug Schading. We spoke together August 15, 2001. He was born in 1948 and was visually impaired he had one good eye that had narrow field, but acuity of 20/80. At age 28 his vision deteriorated even in his good eye and he couldn’t travel independently any more. His perspective on traveling early with limited vision, his experie…
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Stephen Dresser –was born in 1947, he got his first long cane in 8th grade, but he wasn’t taught to use it as a probe and just hooked it on his arm. It wasn’t until high school that he finally received O&M instruction. He remembers having to be convinced that it was possible to move through space without bruises, tripping and clunking into the worl…
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Jim said he wished he had had cane travel in grade school – instead of always sitting on the sidelines. He remembered moving about without the long cane and didn’t recall getting hurt, but when he attended his reunion getting about the campus as an adult he didn’t understand, how he managed without a long cane, because he bumped into a lot of bicyc…
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Beatrice weighed 2 pounds when was born into a family that already had four children. Her mom and dad didn’t have insurance and avoided hospitals. I don’t think my mother real…my mother or father realized how poor my vision was. She remembered that she was only able to see partially out of her right eye. She didn’t realize how little sight she had …
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This week is Michael born in 1943 – 2 years before the long cane was invented. He became blind at 2 years of age due to retinoblastoma. He received his first O&M instruction at the school for the blind from a blind adult. Michael details some of the strategies that the instructor employed to teach him to use sound and some funny outcomes as well. H…
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Myrna is a very intelligent woman who studied music, a career many bright children born blind were funneled into, her husband was a blind piano tuner – another career historically taught to intelligent students at schools for the blind. Myrna broke free of it and joined the modern world in career of assistive technology. She was using GPS before it…
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Jo was gifted in math and was quite capable, the first born – she helped look after her 3 siblings. Although long white canes had been used for 5 years when she became blind, one was not provided to her when she needed it. In school, there were plenty of ways for her to learn independently -she had talking books and eventually learned braille to re…
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Terri prophetically remarked that without the radio’s noise as a beacon she would “end up going off track 2” is chilling for many reasons. First and foremost, that Terri died exactly as she prophesized, she walked (without a mobility tool) off track 2 into the path of an Amtrak train. One problem that may seem benign to sighted people, is her mispl…
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Suzanne grew up with severe visual impairment – she had no way to know if the drop was 6 inches or 60 inches. She got a long cane three short years after the veterans administration started using them and after a few hours of training incorporated it into her travel. Her family wasn’t thrilled by it – but she wasn’t about to go back to having risk …
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Marion became blind at age 60 after a life of having one good eye and one bad eye. She was independent cane traveler before, but the methods of teaching her orientation and mobility at 60 left her in tears and a belief that it was her fault that she was no longer able to be independent when walking outside on her own. Marion tells us about a seriou…
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Grace gives an insightful summary of her interviews with Alvin, George and Frank. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave us a review, ask questions and share with your friends!! Please donate to help Safe Toddles Inc. achieve our mission to provide blind toddlers with a solution fo…
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Alvin said, "I have two daughters and six grand kids. In my career I’ve done everything there is to do in my career. I used to teach mobility. I was superintendent of the Illinois visually handicapped, that’s the rehab center in Chicago. I’ve held about ever job there is. I even tried to drive a truck... This interview was conducted August 23, 1999…
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Not to take away anything from George about his ability to travel – instead it is important to shine a light on the definition of independence and ability – George was first provided a short Lions Club Cane at 14- but given no instruction, save from his classmate. He was also given a long cane, again with no formal instruction. His entire life was …
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The Safe Toddles belt cane is an early 21st century innovation –Some might assume the long white cane is a much, much older mobility tool. Who would believe that it is a mid-20th century innovation – the first long white cane was introduced in 1945. In the grand scheme of blind people – the long white cane being the only mass produced, ubiquitous t…
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Kelvin Crosby, the deafblind potter, has become quite famous on TikTok and this has led to appearances on Good Morning America and CBS News. On this episode Grace asks Kevin to discuss his inventions, the smart guider and the lighted blind cane. The also discuss some of the challenges inaccessible technology create for people with disabilities seek…
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Daniel Simmons has been an O&M Specialist for 14 years. He taught adults before beginning his career providing O&M through early education services. The two O&M specialists discuss the meaning of safe mobility and the need for effective cane tools. Both agree safe mobility is a universal need. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok F…
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Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken reads the single-subject research report on a two-year-old who is blind playing before and wearing pediatric belt canes. The text, figures, and photos with Alt Text can be found - safetoddles.org/blog and gambrosez.wordpress.com Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Plea…
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Ashley's son Damien was one-year-old when she learned about pediatric belt canes from a Wisconsin State Coordinator for Vision Services. Damien wasn't a fan, but has since come to depend on his belt cane. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave us a review, ask questions and share w…
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Andrea learned about the Safe Toddles' pediatric belt cane from a Facebook ad. She introduced Safe Toddles to the world of Tik Tok - her videos of her daughter Kenedi using her first pediatric belt cane went viral! @guiding_Kenedi is her Tik Tok handle. Andrea is a hard-working entrepreneur, single-mother of two toddlers. She has a clothing line an…
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Blog post on gambrosez.wordpress.com and safetoddles.org/blog read aloud by Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken. The single-subject study on a one-year-old girl with optic nerve hypoplasia showed greater number of independent steps after wearing her pediatric belt cane for one month. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks…
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Important update on the progress since airing her recent podcast. Mary's update -he's wearing it more, in more places and those that know him best see positive changes! Yay Mary Stap and Van Buren Michigan schools for being such innovators!! Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave u…
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Audio of the blog post on gambrosez.wordpress.com and safetoddles.org/blog. The single-subject figure and photos of Audrina are available there. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave us a review, ask questions and share with your friends!! Please donate to help Safe Toddles Inc. a…
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Kylie's son Matias was 20 months old when she discovered pediatric belt canes. He is blind due to leber congenital amaurosis and wasn't walking independently. He is four now and is able to use his long cane correctly, artfully as he walks independently in his neighborhood. Matias didn't want to wear his cane, at first. Kylie recommends that parents…
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June Allison discovered Safe Toddles through a social media post. She immediately recognized the pediatric belt cane as something that could help her adopted 2-year-old son Caeden. Caeden has cortical visual impairment and cerebral palsy. Caeden has lower field loss and reduced contrast sensitivity which makes it difficult for him to have confidenc…
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Mary Stap is a Teacher of the Visually Impaired and Orientation and Mobility specialist trained early intervention and elementary school teacher. She describes her approach to working with Donovan, a child with septo optic dysplasia (SOD) who has significant sensory challenges. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube …
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The first known, dedicated wheelchair was invented in 1595 for Phillip II of Spain. Now there are pediatric motorized wheelchairs made so that children who are three years old can operate them independently. The first electric hearing aid was created in 1898. It is possible to be fitted with hearing aids within the first weeks or months after birth…
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Elga Joffee has been an advocate of the pediatric belt cane since its inception and in this interview describes the positive outcomes it had for two of her students in North Carolina. She knows of what she speaks. Elga entered the O&M profession as a graduate student in 1971. She has taught O&M to children in the US and Israel. She is the recipient…
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This study compared the running times of two groups of children with visual impairments, those taught at home and those taught by a physiotherapist at school. They improved running times, but were still significantly slower than sighted children the same age. This review explores how the measuring of running in children who cannot see the path ahea…
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Becky Hommer talks about introducing the pediatric belt cane to a two-year-old who cried, a three-year-old who started running, and a 4-year-old who beat the odds. What they had in common is that wearing the belt cane improved their quality of life. Becky, Grace and Kel explore her experiences and delve into important topic of acceptance of the whi…
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Geri Darko got her first pediatric belt cane in March 2020- and then COVID arrived in Montana like everywhere else. However, she describes wonderful outcomes. It allows her teacher to say, Jack go wash your hands, and three-year-old Jack and 4-year-old Wyatt know the way, they don't need a hand or a guide - they know the way and they like being ind…
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Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken, COMS and Kelvin Crosby explore some of the assumptions Safe Toddles made about blind toddler and preschooler reactions to pediatric belt canes before they were created. Lessons learned included toddlers and preschoolers who are blind and mobility visually impaired did not need to be taught to walk wearing them, nor how to h…
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An in-depth discussion of how to wear the cane most of the day everyday, building a routine around wearing it. How blind toddlers and preschoolers will use it on stairs and moving through a changing world of objects, people and dogs. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave us a revi…
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Dr. Ambrose-Zaken and Kelvin Crosby discuss the methods for introducing the pediatric belt cane to children ages one through five. Grace provides lesson ideas and discusses the gross motor milestones at each age to help you know what to look for in children who are blind and mobility visually impaired and much more- enjoy! Visit our website: Email:…
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Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken lists and defines the three previews that are used to determine if a person with a visual impairment needs a white cane. She also discusses the process of ordering the custom-made pediatric belt cane for your child and much more...! Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! …
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Danielle Montour became blind after surgery to remove her eyes to prevent further spread of cancer. She was born in 1997 and her first introduction to O&M was in 2000, at age 3. Danielle's interview quickly became a debate about the benefits of growing up with and without consistent tactile path information. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddl…
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Michael Byington is a certified orientation and mobility specialist, an avocation that came later in life. He is well aware, that when he was younger, his vision impairment would have disqualified him from this field. He describes his challenges and his unique perspective on life with low vision. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTo…
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Ann grew up in rural America in a large family. She describes her challenges and successes as a child born premature and who lost her vision due to measures used to save her life. She describes a wonderful family life and looks back with the honest perspective of someone who understands how she beat the odds stacked against her. Visit our website: …
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George Stern was a soccer player with lots of promise, and then his parents noticed he was running into walls. Great interview with George, growing up blind. He's so fun, smart and engaging -we were lucky to get a few minutes of his time! Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave us a…
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Co-hosts Kelvin Crosby and Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken discuss ways to accentuate Holidays Sound, Smells, feeling, and Taste for children who were born with sensory impairments. Kelvin shares memories from his childhood growing up with profound hearing loss and what how these other senses came to mean so much more to him. Visit our website: Email: info…
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Co-host Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken interview's Kelvin Crosby about his experience growing up with a hearing impairment and later finding out he was losing is vision due to Usher's Syndrome Type II. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave us a review, ask questions and share with your f…
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Co-host Kelvin Crosby asks Dr. Grace Ambrose-Zaken about the outcomes found in research directly related to growing up blind. The inability to see initially impacts gross motor skills and because of the inability to independently walk safely, concept development, language and social skills become delayed. That's why providing safe mobility early ca…
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Learning about Safe Toddles and who we are. Visit our website: Email: info@Safetoddles.org TikTok Facebook YouTube Thanks for listening! Please, leave us a review, ask questions and share with your friends!! Please donate to help Safe Toddles Inc. achieve our mission to provide blind toddlers with a solution for walking independently with safety. I…
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