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The Economist unlocks American politics, tackling a new theme each week and digging into the data, ideas, and history shaping the country at this dramatic moment. John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Correspondents from across the US and the rest of the world plus expert guests - politicians, pollsters, professors - join the in-depth reporting and discussion every Friday.
 
Delivered before breakfast, The Economist Morning Briefing tells you what’s on the global agenda in the coming day, what to look out for in business, finance and politics and, most importantly, what to make of it. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions, including the full Economist Morning Briefing: https://www.economist.com/briefingoffer. Digital subscribers to The Economist should log in at https://www.economist.com/espresso for access to the ...
 
The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen. Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health-policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic.
 
The EIU Digital Economy podcast is a monthly series examining the technologies, ideas and people driving the digitisation of the global economy. Sponsored by DXC, the podcast aims to help business leaders understand the way in which digital technology affects their companies, their teams, and their careers.
 
We deliver vital business intelligence to executives the world over. With access to over 650 expert analysts and editors across 200 countries worldwide, underpinned by an unrivalled in-house survey panel that bolsters the qualitative and quantitative analysis, we uncover novel and forward-looking perspectives.
 
Rising global temperatures have already increased the frequency of floods, wildfires, droughts, and heatwaves around the world. If humanity does not change course rapidly, the effects of climate change will become more extreme. What can be done to avoid this outcome? Vijay Vaitheeswaran, the Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, will be joined weekly by expert guests to explore how everything—from finance to agriculture, transport to international policy—will have to chang ...
 
Special Relationship is a podcast collaboration that examines the US presidential election from the characteristic perspectives of two leading news organizations. Hosted by The Economist’s John Prideaux and Mic’s Celeste Katz, Special Relationship grapples with the major themes and issues in a campaign that has been anything but predictable. Each episode is a conversation, fusing deep dives into specific themes with broader perspectives provided by global and historical comparisons from both ...
 
For over 60 years CEDA has debated and discussed critical issues through our research and events platform – now we bring the conversation right to you with our Podcasts. Hear directly from some of the best and brightest policy minds in Australia and around the world, alongside our CEO Melinda Cilento and Chief Economist Jarrod Ball, as we explore the issues and pursue solutions that deliver better economic and social outcomes for the greater good.
 
Since the late 19th century, politics and economics have been split from each other, pretended and positioned as separate and unassuming forces. This could not be further from the truth. Before the dawn of Adam Smith, the grandfather of modern day economics, there was but one holistic concept, the Political Economy. Come join Max and Jorrel, modern day Political Economists, as they do their best to converse and discuss political theory, history, economics, and more in the lenses of contempor ...
 
Do you consider economics to be boring and overly complex? This podcast will change your mind. Tune in to grasp complex economic theory, problems and events in a digestible way so you can keep informed and empower yourself with the tools to engage in intellectual debate. If you're looking to boost your general knowledge of world-wide economic events and understand how changes in markets and government policies affect your well-being, this is the place to start. Follow and contact me on Insta ...
 
The Digital Economist Speaker Series drives radical collaboration between global action leaders on the most urgent topics and challenges we face today: climate, health, society, economics. With the global population facing multiple man-made crises that threaten our existence and the wellbeing of the planet, using science and technology to serve human needs is no longer a choice – it's a necessity.
 
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show series
 
Austria is set to enact a bold policy of levying fines on the unvaccinated. We look at what is driving governments to such measures, and whether they will work. Japan’s shift in thinking about its growing elderly population holds lessons for countries set for a similar demographic shift. And why the Mormon church is struggling to retain its foreign…
 
Inflation in America has reached its highest level in four decades. What is the outlook for 2022? Host Tom Standage asks former US treasury secretary Larry Summers. Meanwhile, China is pushing ahead with its plans for a “central bank digital currency”. How do such digital coins stack up against cryptocurrencies? Please subscribe to The Economist fo…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, beware the bossy state, Britain’s party-animal prime minister (11:45) and, why America and China are one military accident away from disaster (18:00) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.econom…
 
After George Floyd’s murder protestors took to the streets, angry about racially-motivated brutality and discrimination. They urged authorities to “defund the police” and over 20 cities listened. But now, with rising murder rates, many of those same places are increasing investment in law enforcement. Can you “refund” and reform the police at the s…
 
The Broadway legend has entertained audiences for four decades. He tells Anne McElvoy why he combines acting and activism and how he became a late-life TikTok sensation. And the star of “Homeland” reveals the personal story that inspired him to highlight Europe’s refugee crisis. Also, he gives us a burst of song from his days working with the late …
 
#108 God’s Frameworks God made a complex world. Humans categorize it using frameworks. Frameworks. That’s what we teach in college level education. God made a complex world. Humans try to categorize it so we can understand it better. In the second session of my Econ class, I give framework assignments to groups of students. They……
 
Governments around the world are deciding it is time to bring big business to heel. Host Rachana Shanbhogue and The Economist’s business editor Jan Piotrowski explore the new age of state interventionism. A suite of old tools is being dusted off and reimagined—from a return to picking winners to turning the century-old global tax system on its head…
 
A new tech boom is disrupting medicine. We investigate how wearable trackers, such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch, could transform health care. And, could the devices help prevent the next pandemic? Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our we…
 
Have you just recently found this podcast? This is a great episode to start with. Peter and Michelle talk about what they learned in 2021 and give a recap of the dozen or so amazing guests that joined the show. They also share the things they are looking forward to next year. If you hear about an episode you like, please go back and have a listen. …
 
Austria is set to enact a bold policy of levying fines on the unvaccinated. We look at what is driving governments to such measures, and whether they will work. Japan’s shift in thinking about its growing elderly population holds lessons for countries set for a similar demographic shift. And why the Mormon church is struggling to retain its foreign…
 
Inflation in America has reached its highest level in four decades. What is the outlook for 2022? Host Tom Standage asks former US treasury secretary Larry Summers. Meanwhile, China is pushing ahead with its plans for a “central bank digital currency”. How do such digital coins stack up against cryptocurrencies? Please subscribe to The Economist fo…
 
Democrats will spend the week battling for a tightening of laws on casting votes; that will overshadow Republicans’ worrying push into how those votes are counted and certified. Earthquakes remain damnably unpredictable, but new research suggests a route to early-warning systems. And why hammams, the declining bathhouses of the Arab world, will cli…
 
Democrats will spend the week battling for a tightening of laws on casting votes; that will overshadow Republicans’ worrying push into how those votes are counted and certified. Earthquakes remain damnably unpredictable, but new research suggests a route to early-warning systems. And why hammams, the declining bathhouses of the Arab world, will cli…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, beware the bossy state, Britain’s party-animal prime minister (11:45) and, why America and China are one military accident away from disaster (18:00) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.econom…
 
After George Floyd’s murder protestors took to the streets, angry about racially-motivated brutality and discrimination. They urged authorities to “defund the police” and over 20 cities listened. But now, with rising murder rates, many of those same places are increasing investment in law enforcement. Can you “refund” and reform the police at the s…
 
The queen’s second son has been stripped of his titles—an apparent bid to insulate the crown from his legal troubles. But dangers to the prince and to the monarchy remain. A blockade of Mali, intended to force a return to democratic order, may worsen security and entrench foreign influences. And the genre of “eco-horror” evolves alongside environme…
 
The queen’s second son has been stripped of his titles—an apparent bid to insulate the crown from his legal troubles. But dangers to the prince and to the monarchy remain. A blockade of Mali, intended to force a return to democratic order, may worsen security and entrench foreign influences. And the genre of “eco-horror” evolves alongside environme…
 
The Broadway legend has entertained audiences for four decades. He tells Anne McElvoy why he combines acting and activism and how he became a late-life TikTok sensation. And the star of “Homeland” reveals the personal story that inspired him to highlight Europe’s refugee crisis. Also, he gives us a burst of song from his days working with the late …
 
While Britons followed covid strictures, the prime minister’s residence hosted boozy gatherings; widespread fury hints that his prevarications this time may be his last as leader. Religious institutions struggled during the pandemic, as all businesses did—so they are selling assets and courting new customers in innovative ways. And road rage is com…
 
While Britons followed covid strictures, the prime minister’s residence hosted boozy gatherings; widespread fury hints that his prevarications this time may be his last as leader. Religious institutions struggled during the pandemic, as all businesses did—so they are selling assets and courting new customers in innovative ways. And road rage is com…
 
Governments around the world are deciding it is time to bring big business to heel. Host Rachana Shanbhogue and The Economist’s business editor Jan Piotrowski explore the new age of state interventionism. A suite of old tools is being dusted off and reimagined—from a return to picking winners to turning the century-old global tax system on its head…
 
The country’s children have missed more in-person learning than those in most of the rich world—to their cost. We ask why battles about schooling rage on. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, came to power on big promises; few were fulfilled. We ask about the skimpy legacy he leaves behind. And a look at the metaverse’s red-hot property marke…
 
The country’s children have missed more in-person learning than those in most of the rich world—to their cost. We ask why battles about schooling rage on. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, came to power on big promises; few were fulfilled. We ask about the skimpy legacy he leaves behind. And a look at the metaverse’s red-hot property marke…
 
A new tech boom is disrupting medicine. We investigate how wearable trackers, such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch, could transform health care. And, could the devices help prevent the next pandemic? Kenneth Cukier hosts. For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our we…
 
This week’s flurry of diplomacy aims to address what Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, says he wants. He cannot get it. Does an invasion of Ukraine hang in the balance? At an annual jamboree of economists our correspondent finds an unusual focus on the future—in particular the future of home working. And why Cuba has an enormous trade in grey-mar…
 
This week’s flurry of diplomacy aims to address what Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, says he wants. He cannot get it. Does an invasion of Ukraine hang in the balance? At an annual jamboree of economists our correspondent finds an unusual focus on the future—in particular the future of home working. And why Cuba has an enormous trade in grey-mar…
 
China is unlikely to reopen its borders in 2022 as it continues its zero-covid policy. What will the long-term impact of the pandemic be on tourism and business travel? Meanwhile, the tourist map of South-East Asia will look very different in 2022 as the number of destinations adopting the “sandbox” model is set to grow. Tom Standage hosts. Please …
 
China is unlikely to reopen its borders in 2022 as it continues its zero-covid policy. What will the long-term impact of the pandemic be on tourism and business travel? Meanwhile, the tourist map of South-East Asia will look very different in 2022 as the number of destinations adopting the “sandbox” model is set to grow. Tom Standage hosts. Please …
 
The country has the world’s worst estimated covid-death total—but as another variant takes hold there are reasons for optimism. Mexico’s president has some old-fashioned notions about energy, and his pet legislation would make it both dirtier and costlier. And the Orient Express was itself a murder victim, just one line in a continent-spanning rail…
 
The country has the world’s worst estimated covid-death total—but as another variant takes hold there are reasons for optimism. Mexico’s president has some old-fashioned notions about energy, and his pet legislation would make it both dirtier and costlier. And the Orient Express was itself a murder victim, just one line in a continent-spanning rail…
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to talk to Mr Putin, the rise of performative work (9:45) and the lingering effects of covid-19 on elite footballers (15:00) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer …
 
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