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Over the past two years, Canadian Geographic has been running “Passing the Mic,” a podcast training program in remote Nunavut communities. This week, we are pleased to showcase the third episode of this year’s series, which features stories produced by the students at the Netsilik School in Taloyoak, Nunavut. The aim of this program is to give Inui…
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In this episode, we're back in Taloyoak, Nunavut, mainland Canada’s most northerly community, to talk with Joyce Ashevak, Martha Neeveacheak and Roger Oleekatalik. They are three of the students who took part in Canadian Geographic’s Passing the Mic program, which aims to give Inuit youth the tools to share their own stories with the world. Joyce a…
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We are thrilled to be taking you back to Taloyoak, Nunavut, the northernmost community in mainland Canada. In this exciting episode, we sit down with Lenny Panigayak, Taloyoak’s mayor and viral TikTok star (@aqigiaq), who shares moments from his life and Inuit culture with his tens of thousands of followers. The Explore Podcast team met Mayor Lenny…
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The pack-ice 'round us cracks and groans; The old St. Roch, she creaks and moans. - Stan Rogers In 1940, the wooden-hulled St. Roch became the second ship to successfully sail the Northwest Passage and the first to do it from west to east, captained by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's Henry Larsen. Our guest on this episode, Ken Burton, recreate…
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For this holiday episode of Explore, we’re dipping into our Royal Canadian Geographical Society files for the reading of a story written by RCGS founding President and Arctic explorer Charles Camsell, recalling a memorable Christmas he had on the trail to the Klondike in the late 19th century. In the early 1900s, travelling by canoe and horseback, …
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“The question would be, “Why not?” We love a good journey here on Explore, and Dianne Whelan went on a doozy of one with lots of great stories to share. Whelan became the first person to travel the entire Trans Canada Trail across Canada, the longest hiking trail in the world stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Arctic Ocean to the Pacific. Sh…
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Today’s guest is Jimmy Ullikatalik, the manager of the Taloyoak Hunters and Trappers Association and project manager for the Aviqtuuq Inuit Protected and Conserved Area (IPCA), a proposed 90,000 square kilometres of marine, terrestrial and fresh-water ecosystems in Nunavut. Jimmy also represented Nunavut at COP26, the UN Climate Change conference i…
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Best-selling author Karen Pinchin is our guest on this episode of Explore. Her new book, Kings of their Own Ocean, is the phenomenal tale of an incredible fish, the bluefin tuna, which has gone from being the cornerstone of the Roman Empire to the much sought-after catch brought to near extinction in the past century in our own boom-bust, globalize…
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I’m thrilled to have Mark Terry with us today. He’s had a long and interesting career that includes everything from being a newspaper reporter at the Toronto Star to making a documentary about the master of horror Clive Barker to his ongoing work with the UN producing groundbreaking documentaries about the impact of climate change on our polar regi…
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In January 2023, Caroline Coté set the record for a solo expedition to the South Pole by a woman, travelling 1,130 kilometres on skis from Hercules Inlet to the South Pole in just 33 days. This is a fun and fascinating conversation. The bulk of it is about her record-breaking trip to the South Pole on her own, dragging everything she needs in a sle…
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*Trigger Warning. This episode is about Residential Schools and includes descriptions of abuse. It may only be suitable for some listeners. If you require emotional support, there is a 24-hour Residential School Crisis Line, which you can reach at 1-866-925-4419. Jeannie Ehaloak was just four years old when she was taken away from her parents on Vi…
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We're thrilled that Gary and Joanie McGuffin are joining us for this last episode of our 2023 Summer Canoe series. Be sure to check out the previous two, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and RCGS Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts. Arguably no couple has paddled more of Canada's waterways than Gary and Joanie have together, and it all started jus…
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"That's what was in my head. If anything went wrong, if I let the paddle slip out of my hand, if it broke, if I had some freak muscle spasm or cramp, I'm going over Niagara falls." It's always great to have RCGS Westaway Explorer-in-Residence Adam Shoalts back on the podcast. And this conversation underlines why. He joins us to talk about his epic,…
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We're thrilled to have Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as our guest on Explore as we kick off our second annual Summer Canoe series. This is a fun one. As you will hear, he is absolutely passionate about canoeing. It's a past-time he fell in love with early while paddling with his father, the late Prime Minister and fellow canoe enthusiast, Pierre Tr…
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“When you have that moment of empowerment — when someone believes in you — all of a sudden, a switch is thrown in your head, and you believe it’s possible.” James Cameron, ocean explorer and Oscar-winning director of Titanic, Avatar, Aliens and more, is our guest with Dr Joe MacInnis on this episode of Explore. The two friends took part in an intim…
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Professional wildlife photographer Ryan Tidman has an up-close view of the damaging impact logging old-growth forests is having on Vancouver Island. The Trebek Initiative Grantee is investigating how cutting down the last remaining giant cedars and redwoods is taking away the dens of the island's black bear population. On that rainy island, caves a…
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When Pascale Marceau came up with a name for her latest high Arctic expedition, "Arctic Awe," she thought this would refer to the awe she felt looking at the stark beauty of the land and sea ice she encountered. It wound up being so much more than that, awe born from extreme external challenges and the need to dig deep within herself. We're lucky t…
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In her Great Island Expedition, RCGS Explorer-in-Residence Jill Heinerth and her team went to raise the voices of lives, ships and an aircraft lost during the Second World War from the waters in and around Newfoundland. When we last had Jill Heinerth on the podcast, one of the stories she shared as she prepared for this diving expedition was about …
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"I've done a lot of hard things. At last count, I think I've done 33 or 34 expeditions, and I would say this was the hardest thing I've ever done. Chemo and the monoclonal therapy that I was doing... I was a mess. I would build myself up (between treatments) over the course of a few weeks, where I'd have a seven or ten-day decent period where I wou…
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"On our way back out, we hit all the volcanic gases. It was like the volcano had burped. We had hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. We were hoping to not find sulphur dioxide because that's one of those gases that is more indicative of an active magma chamber." RCGS Fellow Christian Stenner joins Explore to talk …
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It’s always a special moment when one of the RCGS Explorers-in-Residence drops by the podcast. This conversation with George Kourounis is no exception. George is one of the world’s leading storm chasers, broadcasters, and adventure travellers. His busy schedule has him doing everything from chasing tornados to jumping into volcanoes to surviving ep…
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“If you want to understand what it means to be fully human, go to Africa.” Mario Rigby’s claim to fame is an impressive one. The RCGS Fellow was the first person to walk from Cape Town to Cairo solo. A Toronto based eco-adventurer, focused on sustainable travel and transport, Rigby covered 12,000 kilometres over two-and-a-half years and had a lifet…
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George Angohiatok grew up as among the last Inuit to live a fully traditional, nomadic life in the Canadian Arctic. As a child in Nunavut in the 1950s and 60s, he lived with his parents, siblings and grandparents on the land, seal hunting on sea ice in the winters, and returning to land to hunt game and fish in the warmer months. That all came to a…
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In this second episode of Explore from Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, we're passing the mic to two of our star students from our Canadian Geographic Podcast Workshop at the Canadian High Arctic Research Station. Tyler Agligoetok and Sinclair Lyall were among local Inuit youth who took part in five days of podcast training and community open houses. In thi…
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"Indigenous People have the knowledge. And if we work together with scientists, we can come up with so much more than what only Inuit know or what scientists know. It's a great tool." - Jeannie Ehaloak, Polar Knowledge Canada, Cambridge Bay, Nunavut. We're thrilled to bring you the first of three episodes from our December visit to Cambridge Bay, N…
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"The boreal forest is the largest intact forest left on the planet, it holds a quarter of the world's wetlands. It is a climate regulator." You could argue there is nothing that binds Canada together like our boreal forest. It's defined by vast stands of spruce and seemingly endless lakes and swamps stretching beyond horizons. It runs in an uninter…
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For our final episode on board the Polar Prince, sailing Atlantic Canada's Bay of Fundy, we're spending some time under the waves and looking to the skies, as we join a fascinating cross-section of scientists, students and researchers who make up this Students on Ice Ocean conservation expedition. With the team from New Brunswick's Huntsman Marine …
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We're still riding the Bay of Fundy waves this episode with the Students on Ice - Ocean Conservation Expedition. Today we're leaving the sea and heading up the Point Wolf River in New Brunswick's Fundy National Park, with the story of a remarkable effort to bring the Fundy Atlantic Salmon back from the brink of extinction. A unique subspecies, unli…
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For our 50th episode, Explore is taking to the seas! We join a Students on Ice expedition to the Bay of Fundy aboard the Polar Prince, on an Ocean Conservation Expedition led by RCGS Fellow and SOI President Geoff Green. This is a working expedition with scientists, researchers, commercial fishers, Indigenous youth, students and artists. Over the n…
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It's mushroom season, so we happily took up Keith Seifert on his offer to go on a mushroom and fungi walk in the Gatineau Hills. Keith is one of the world's leading experts on fungi, having spent over forty years studying them on five continents, both as a research academic and as the top scientist on the subject for Agriculture Canada. He is the p…
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"Many people have said this was genocide. Justice Sinclair says it's genocide. The former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has called it genocide. So how do we investigate that? What are the patterns that we see from Residential School to Residential School in relation to the deaths of the children, and who do we hold accountable for that?" Kimbe…
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"More Canadians saw Paul Henderson's winning goal with 34 seconds left in game eight than saw the moon landing three years earlier. And they watched the moon landing, it's not like they didn't care about it. I pointed this out to Wayne Gretzky, and he said, 'This was more important.'" -Author John U. Bacon - The Greatest Comeback Fifty years ago th…
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"I was in a small place in Uganda called Fort Portal. We were going to leave that day when the army showed up looking for me, and my husband would just not let them take me. So they took him. It was awful, even now when I think about it. For years I had nightmares because there were two army men at his head with rifles and two pointing at his stoma…
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We’re thrilled to have Michelle Valberg with us on the podcast, just after her appointment to the Order of Canada for her photography and philanthropy, and her work raising awareness about the beauty and fragility of Canada’s North. Her career as a photographer and explorer has spanned most parts of our globe and this great nation of ours. Her work…
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“If the canoe is not on the Canadian flag, it is most certainly to be found in the Canadian imagination.” While Roy MacGregor wasn’t born in a canoe, growing up in and around Ontario’s Algonquin Park, he might as well have been. For as long as he can remember, he’s had a self-described love affair with the canoe and all it represents to this nation…
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Now that we’re deep into summer paddling season, let's hop in a canoe with a genuine Canadian canoeing legend and ride some frothing, churning white water. As the founder of Blackfeather Wilderness Adventures, and Trailhead Outfitters, for more than 50 years, Wally Schaber has led trips down Canada’s most iconic rivers, many in the arctic, like the…
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Geologist Dr Gordon "Oz" Osinsky joins us on the pod to talk about his fascinating expedition with two astronauts to the massive Kamestastin meteor crater in remote northern Labrador. With NASA and the world's space agencies preparing to return to the moon, Dr Oz is helping train potential lunar explorers on what they could find there. The 35 milli…
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Trigger warning: This podcast contains discussions about the abuse of children and may not be appropriate for all listeners. “Who has been held accountable for the things that have been done to us? Nobody.” - a survivor of St Michael's Residential School Investigative journalist Connie Walker joins us on Explore to talk about her new Spotify podcas…
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During the pandemic, it’s safe to say most of us spent some time self-isolating, but not quite in the way our guest today did. Polar explorer and RCGS Fellow Sunniva Sorby spent over a year and a half, including two long winters, in an uninsulated 1930 trapper’s hut on the Arctic island of Svalbard, which is halfway to the North Pole from northern …
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Content warning: This episode contains descriptions of violence and abuse experienced by children. This episode is about the incredible journey of a group of new Canadians. Former child soldiers who fought in Sudan during Africa's bloodiest civil war were shipped off to Cuba and finally found refuge in Canada — many of them in Brooks, Alta. Our gue…
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I'm thrilled to have Christian Stenner, one of Canada’s leading cave explorers and a Fellow of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, as our guest on this episode of Explore. It's the International Year of Caves and Karst, which is why we wanted to have Christian on the podcast now. But given the mind boggling stories he has, the tight squeezes h…
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We’re thrilled to have Ray Zahab back on the podcast. He was our very first guest back in 2019. Give that one a listen if you want a great overview of his amazing career as an extreme athlete and expedition leader travelling to some of the hottest, coldest, most remote parts of our planet. His latest expedition, a traverse of Ellesmere Island on fo…
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When Moose Jaw, Sask. comedy duo “Leroy and Leroy” began posting their short video hot-takes on Instagram and TikTok in 2021, their hope was to get up to 10,000 followers. Just over a year later, their quirky videos highlighting the odd sites and signs found along Canada’s roadways now have hundreds of thousands of followers and over 12 million vie…
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It’s always fun when one of our RCGS Explorers-in-Residence comes on the podcast; they’re always up to the most fascinating things. That’s especially true of Jill Heinerth. An internationally acclaimed cave diver, bestselling author, and award-winning documentary filmmaker, Jill has been spending the pandemic exploring Canada’s longest underwater c…
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Severn Cullis-Suzuki, the new Executive Director of the David Suzuki Foundation, has been an environmental activist for almost as long as she can remember. That isn’t surprising when you consider that her father is David Suzuki, Canada’s leading environmentalist and longtime host of CBC’s much-loved show The Nature of Things. Cullis-Suzuki’s moment…
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“To protect the Arctic is to protect the rest of the world.” So says Lisa Koperqualuk, Vice-President of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, in this fascinating episode about the challenges faced by Inuit communities in the Arctic today. Koperqualuk discusses the impacts of climate change in the Arctic, the need to regulate Arctic shipping, the importan…
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Musician and politician Charlie Angus is our guest this episode, talking about his new book, Cobalt: Cradle of the Demon Metals, Birth of a Mining Superpower. It is a fresh look at his Northern Ontario hometown of Cobalt and its silver mining boom in the early 1900s, which he says changed not only Canadian mining, but how mining has been carried ou…
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Perry Bellegarde is the new Honorary President of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society — a ceremonial role previously held by the late Alex Trebek. You likely also know Bellegarde from his time as a transformational National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations from 2014 to 2021, where he helped push key legislation through Parliament, includi…
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It’s hard to think of a person who has written with more passion about Canada, and in as many different mediums, as Dave Bidini. You might know him as the songwriter and frontman of the Rheostatics – that most Canadian of Canadian bands — or for his best-selling books On a Cold Road, The Tropic of Hockey, Keon and Me or Midnight Light, or from his …
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Today we’re talking to Dr. Daniel Pauly, professor of marine biology at the University of British Columbia, the leading expert on the declining state of the world's fisheries and something of a philosopher. Fish is the last wild catch: the last animal food source we hunt and eat en masse from the wild. But Daniel Pauly warns that we are rapidly app…
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