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One hundred days ago, the 117th Congress of the United States was sworn in, and we began this series covering the daily life and work of Congresswoman Teresa Leger Fernandez. We talk about what’s been accomplished so far, and what challenges lie ahead.
 
Rio Grande del Norte National Monument is an ecological treasure in Northern New Mexico. Rep. Teresa Leger Fernandez gives a report from the top of the mountain, and talks about the importance of changing how campaigns are financed.
 
What is the role of Congress in determining foreign policy, given the strong role of the executive branch? What does Congress have to say about water policy, given that states play a large role in determining their own water law? And how do we transition away from the fossil fuel industry in a state where we’re heavily dependent on its revenues?…
 
What does it mean to spend trillions of dollars on infrastructure? Where does the money come from to pay for it? And what is involved in getting new voting rights legislation passed? Also hear how Teresa Leger Fernandez’s Catholic faith affects the way she thinks about politics in Diary of a Congresswoman.…
 
Follow first-time representative to Congress Teresa Leger Fernandez as she navigates the process of representing her country and her district. This is a chance for those of us outside the halls of Congress to understand how things get done…or don’t…and how New Mexico is represented during a transitional moment in U.S. history.…
 
Many of our "essential workers" pay into the unemployment system but get nothing back when they’re unemployed—because of their immigration status. We talk to organizer Marcela Diaz about the challenges—and opportunities—of navigating the health and economic crises caused by the global pandemic.
 
The new book, "100% Community: Ensuring 10 Vital Services For Surviving,” shows how to build county-based systems that ensure well being for all their residents. We speak with authors Dr. Katherine Ortega Courtney and Dominic Cappello.
 
Host Mary-Charlotte Domandi speaks with Stuart Kauffman – a medical doctor, complex systems research scientist, author, MacArthur Fellow and Santa Fe resident – about how the coronavirus spreads and the importance of social distancing in stopping exponential growth.
 
Historian C.J. Alvarez talks about his new book, “Border Land, Border Water,” and the history of construction on the border, from Mexican independence to the present. We discuss how these projects both divide and connect the two countries—and cause catastrophic consequences to the environment.
 
The Mexican gray wolf was brought to near extinction by predator-extermination campaigns, spearheaded by the livestock industry. The Endangered Species Act made it possible for wolves to be reintroduced into the wild, where they can do their work as apex predators to keep the rest of the ecosystem in balance. But the pressure against them is still …
 
Author, radio producer, and aural historian Jack Loeffler’s new memoir, “Headed into the Wind,” takes us on a journey of inner and outer freedom in nature and society. After witnessing an atomic bomb test, he realized that our world was insane, and sought new paths, including the counterculture, the environmental movement, jazz music, old-time Hisp…
 
Middlebury professor Allison Stanger’s new book, "Whistleblowers: Honesty in America from Washington to Trump,” recounts the long American tradition of whistleblowing from even before the Revolutionary War, how whistleblowers have been treated (spoiler alert: not very well), and what’s at stake in our new digital world.…
 
Fred Hampton was a young, charismatic, and brilliant leader in Chicago's African American community when he was gunned down by the police in service of the FBI. Hampton’s attorney and biographer, Santa Fean Jeff Haas, talks about his life and legacy.
 
Michael Berman’s new book “Perdido: Sierra San Luis” is a journey in photographs and stories about a complicated landscape on both sides of the Mexico-U.S. border, where the natural world has been compromised and where survival depends on a complexity of relationships.
 
Santa Fe author Mark Winne’s new book, “Food Town, USA: Seven Unlikely Cities That are Changing the Way We Eat,” is not just a food travelogue, but also the story of how American cities are rebuilding themselves and their local food systems through healthy food entrepreneurship—and along the way starting to heal the wounds of poverty, racism, poor …
 
Photographer Joan Myers has spent over 40 years making images of the American West—not the grand, majestic landscapes of previous generations, but complex, layered images of decaying icons, strange cultural juxtapositions and the myths that underly our sense of place.
 
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