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Native Opinion is a unique Indigenous culture education Radio show & podcast from an American Indian perspective on current affairs. The Hosts of this show are Michael Kickingbear, an enrolled member of the Mashantucket Pequot tribal nation of Connecticut and David GreyOwl, of the Echoda Eastern Band of Cherokee nation of Alabama. Together they present Indigenous views on American history, politics, the environment, and culture. This show is open to all people, and its main focus is to provi ...
 
Wisdom is the next step in gaining knowledge. And with that, the Native Learning Center has created the Hoporenkv Native American Podcast. Hoporenkv (Hopo-thlee-in-ka) is the Creek word for “wisdom”. Hoporenkv Native American Podcast is the all new audio podcast venture from the NLC to provide short and focused information on various topics and subject matter related to NAHASDA in shorter formats than our typical weekly webinars. Make sure to visit the NLC website to learn more about the upc ...
 
The presented readings are featured with permission from Pastor Terry Wildman. Pastor Wildman is passionate about sharing the Gospel with Native Americans, in a culturally relevant way. Learn more about his vision at rainsongmusic.net and firstnationsversion.com. Native American Ministries Sunday (NAMS) reminds us of the contributions made by Native Americans to our society. Our generosity supports Native American outreach within annual conferences and across the United States and provides s ...
 
The Native American Flute Music podcast is hosted by Bill Webb. Bill Webb is a composer, performer and singer of original music featuring Native American flute and world instruments. The Native American Flute Podcast includes music from dozens of his published albums from the first release, 'Native American Flute' in 2003 to 'Medicine' released in 2017. New albums will be played on the weekly podcasts as they are released along with the many previous albums. Native American Flute guest artis ...
 
History podcasts of Mexico, Latina, Latino, Hispanic, Chicana, Chicano, Mexicana, Mexicano, genealogy, mexico, mexican, mexicana, mexicano, mejico, mejicana, mejicano, hispano, hispanic, hispana, latino, latina, latin, america, espanol, espanola, spanish, indigenous, indian, indio, india, native, native american, chicano, chicana, mesoamerican, mesoamerica, raza, podcast, podcasting, nuestra, familia, or unida are welcome here. If it has to do with the history of America, California, Oregon, ...
 
This podcast was developed as part of an elementary-level Clark County School District Teaching American History Grant. The three-year grant will fund six modules per year with each module focusing on a different era of American history and a different pedagogical theme. This podcast focuses on Native Americans of the Colonial Era and Technology Integration in Elementary Schools. Participants in the grant are third, fourth, and fifth grade teachers in Clark County (the greater Las Vegas area ...
 
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show series
 
Feeling down about museums? We have so many reasons to, but Chris Newell, Tribal Community Member-in-Residence at UConn and Director of Education at the Akomawt Educational Initiative, gives a dose of optimism about the future of museums. Learn more about the Seeing Truth exhibition at our website. Follow us on Twitter @WhyArguePod and on Instagram…
 
Want more knowledge about payday loans, cash advances, car title loans, and managing debt? In today’s episode join Ouista Atkins the Training and Development Coordinator for the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center as well as Lisa Rothfarb- Attorney in the Division of Financial Practices for the Federal Trade Commission to prevent the…
 
Today’s book is: The Diné Reader: An Anthology of Navajo Literature, which is the 2022 Before Columbus Foundation American Book Award Winner. The Diné Reader showcases the breadth, depth, and diversity of Diné creative artists and their poetry, fiction, and nonfiction prose, in a wide-ranging anthology. The collected works display a rich variety of…
 
In the early twenty-first century Bolivian social movements made streets, plazas, and highways into the decisively important spaces for acting politically, rivaling and at times exceeding voting booths and halls of government. The Sovereign Street documents this important period, showing how indigenous-led mass movements reconfigured the politics a…
 
The future of Honduras begins and ends on the white sand beaches of Tela Bay on the country's northeastern coast where Garifuna, a Black Indigenous people, have resided for over two hundred years. In The Ends of Paradise: Race, Extraction, and the Struggle for Black Life in Honduras (Stanford UP, 2022), Christopher A. Loperena examines the Garifuna…
 
"The misery inflicted on people of color because of hatred has to end. Tribes in the West are trapped, locked in during a deadly storm because of no infrastructure, (roads), problems created by hatred. People dumped on streets during the coldest Christmas night in DC history, because of hate. Accountability has to take place."…
 
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints has always been globally situated, argues Montana State history professor Amanda Hendrix-Komoto in Imperial Zions: Religion, Race, and Family in the American West and the Pacific (U Nebraska, 2022). Through mission work, polygamous marriage, and extensive kinship networks, LDS members sought to create…
 
"As we approach 2023 it is anybody’s guess how this nation ends up. With the midterms out of the way, the Republican Party already has their new version of Trump in Representative-Elect Santos. He ran his entire campaign on a lie, and of course, there are right wing voters who are embracing him, and to be fair, some who want him gone."…
 
This podcast is sponsored by The Mohegan Trading Post, selling Native American fine art, apparel, indigenous based foods, and craft supplies. Episode Description: Another "Christmas" holiday is here. How do you celebrate? How do Native People Celebrate? In this episode, we explore this question just a bit... Also, Climate change is contributing to …
 
In far northeastern Alaska lies one of the most remarkable, and contested, places in North America: the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. This coastal arctic region is a place of great natural beauty, ecological importance, as well as being home and birthplace of the Gwich'in people. It's also thought to contain massive fossil fuel wealth, making it…
 
In 1893 Frederick Jackson Turner famously argued that the generational process of meeting and conquering the supposedly uncivilized western frontier is what forged American identity. In the late twentieth century, “new western” historians dissected the mythologized western histories that Turner and others had long used to embody American triumph an…
 
Common understandings drawn from biblical references, literature, and art portray deserts as barren places that are far from God and spiritual sustenance. In our own time, attention focuses on the rigors of climate change in arid lands and the perils of the desert in the northern Mexican borderlands for migrants seeking shelter and a new life. Boun…
 
In Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museums (Harvard University Press, 2022 for paperback edition), Samuel J. Redman, Associate Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts, uncovers the equally fascinating and disturbing history behind the vast collections of human remains assembled by medical and natural histor…
 
Why do we feel the need to belong, and what happens when we don’t? This episode explores: What it takes to belong. Why it physically hurts to be excluded. How perspective-gathering can help create more inclusion. A Discussion of the book Belonging: The Science of Creating Connection and Bridging Divides. Today’s book is: Belonging: The Science of C…
 
The lie about equality and equal rights is just that. They are just that, lies. When laws have to be created to create “equal rights and protections”, then there was never any intent to provide “equal rights and protections” for everyone without it being forced.توسط Native Opinion Incorporated
 
The Great Power of Small Nations: Indigenous Diplomacy in the Gulf South (U Pennsylvania Press, 2022) tackles questions of Native power past and present and provides a fresh examination of the formidable and resilient Native nations—including Biloxis, Choctaws, Chitimachas, Chickasaws, Houmas, Mobilians, and Tunicas—who helped shape the modern Gulf…
 
Americans celebrate a holiday they call Thanksgiving. It is a time where they share food and time with families, watch commercialized parades on TV, and then (some) finish their day by watching a professional football game. For indigenous people whose traditional territories are encroached upon each and every day, "Thanksgiving" is actually a day o…
 
Join Ouista Atkins the Training and Development Coordinator from the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center as well as have Rosario Mendez, Attorney, Division of Consumer and Business Education, Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Kira Krown, Consumer Education Specialist, Division of Consumer and Business Education, Federal Trade Commis…
 
Most of what people think they know about Texas history is wrong, argues Bucknell University history professor Paul Barba in Country of the Cursed and the Driven: Slavery in the Texas Borderlands (U Nebraska Press, 2021). Setting out to write a book on Texas history that didn't mention The Alamo, Barba instead views the region's past through the le…
 
Antonio T. Bly had collected and edited hundreds of advertisements offering a reward for enslaved Native Americans who run away from their masters. Escaping Slavery: A Documentary History of Native American Runaways in British North America (Lexington Books, 2022) captures the lives of numerous individuals who refused to sacrifice their humanity in…
 
It has always been said that rats will desert a sinking ship. Well, the nation is getting a good look at who the rats are and what ship is sinking. Native people have always been dragged on board sinking ships by the rats with no lifelines for Native people when things go wrong. Now, we are refusing to allow ourselves to be subjected.…
 
Amanda Furiasse received her PhD in Religion and Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies from Florida State University in 2018. Her research unfolds at the convergence of religion, health, and technology and explores how African communities use religious ritual as a mechanism to heal from violence and trauma. She is Co-Founder and Curator at the Rel…
 
Working with a group of over fifty students at the Little Wound School in Kyle, South Dakota, Mark Hetzel collected countless hours of oral history interviews with Oglala Lakota people on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Mark and his students then turned those interviews into a 7-part audio series that attempts to piece together the long and comp…
 
As globalisation continues languages are disappearing faster than ever, leaving our planet's linguistic diversity leaping towards extinction. The science of how languages are acquired is becoming more advanced and the internet is bringing us new ways of teaching the next generation, however it is increasingly challenging for minority languages to s…
 
Jeremy Duperteis Bangs, a leading expert in the history of the Pilgrims of the Plymouth Colony, overturns stereotypes with exciting new analyses of colonial and Native life in Plymouth Colony, of religious toleration, and of historical memory. New Light on the Old Colony: Plymouth, the Dutch Context of Toleration, and Patterns of Pilgrim Commemorat…
 
How does identity and experience inform your writing? This episode explores: Professor Talty’s journey from community college student to college professor. The importance of supportive mentors and professors. Using identity and experience ethically in fiction and nonfiction. Why finding the right form for your story matters. A discussion of the boo…
 
The Texas Revolution has long been cast as an epic episode in the origins of the American West. As the story goes, larger-than-life figures like Sam Houston, David Crockett, and William Barret Travis fought to free Texas from repressive Mexican rule. In Unsettled Land: From Revolution to Republic, the Struggle for Texas (Basic Books, 2022), histori…
 
"Desperation will give way to crazy antics. The Republican party is full of antics and will pull out all the stops to see which version of crazy will top the next. What will they think of next!!!?"توسط Native Opinion Incorporated
 
Is the climate agenda all talk and not enough action? With storms becoming more intense and people suffering from the ravages, is there really a direction? We look at some of the tragic effects of hurricane Ian, Fiona, and Maria with critical thought surrounding how the United States is reacting to Climate Change.…
 
The Seven Circles: Indigenous Teachings for Living Well, by Chelsey Luger and Thosh Collins, was published by HarperOne in 2022. In this honest and intentional book, Luger and Collins takes us out of capitalism and into indigenous territory to learn what true wellness means. In this revolutionary self-help guide, two beloved Native American wellnes…
 
The story of the Thirteen Colonies’ struggle for independence from Britain is well known to every American schoolchild. But at the start of the Revolutionary War, there were more than thirteen British colonies in North America. Patriots were surrounded by Indigenous homelands and loyal provinces. Independence had its limits. North of America: Loyal…
 
From the late nineteenth through most of the twentieth century, the evangelical Protestant Grenfell Mission in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, created a network of hospitals, schools, orphanages, stores, and industries with the goal of bringing health and organized society to settler fisherfolk and Indigenous populations. This infrastructure als…
 
Greg Marchildon interviews Molly P. Rozum, the author of Grasslands Grown: Creating Place on the U.S. Northern Plains and Canadian Prairies (U of Nebraska P & U of Manitoba P, 2021). Molly Rozum is currently the Ronald R. Nelson Chair of Great Plains and South Dakota History at the University of South Dakota. She received her PhD in history from th…
 
A year after John Bradstreet’s raid of 1758—the first and largest British-American riverine raid mounted during the Seven Years’ War (known in North America as the French and Indian War)—Benjamin Franklin hailed it as one of the great “American” victories of the war. Bradstreet heartily agreed, and soon enough, his own official account was adopted …
 
Greg Marchildon interviews Benjamin Hoy, author of A Line of Blood and Dirt: Creating the Canada-United States Border across Indigenous Lands (Oxford UP, 2021). Hoy’s book is a history of the infrastructure, policies, and personnel that were put in place over the past three centuries to create a boundary between the United States and British North …
 
Greg Marchildon interviews historian and ethnographer Jennifer Brown on her two most recent books. The first, Ojibwe Stories from the Upper Berens River: A Irving Hallowell and Adam Bigmouth in Conversation (U of Nebraska Press, 2018) concerns the interactions of American anthropologist A. Irving Hallowell with the Berens River band on the east sid…
 
President Abraham Lincoln ordered the largest mass execution of Indigenous people in American history, following the 1862 uprising of hungry Dakota in Minnesota and suspiciously speedy trials. He also issued the largest commutation of executions in American history for the same act. But there is much more to the story of Lincoln’s interactions and …
 
There has been an old belief among many voters for decades, generations, that old white men know what’s best for the nation and are the best choices to keep them in public office as lawmakers. That old myth could not be more wrong, and the myth needs to die.توسط Native Opinion Incorporated
 
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